Post resistance exercise hypotension on distinct types of somatotype characteristics

Gilmar Weber Senna, Estevão Scudese, Marzo Edir Da Silva-Grigoletto, Antonio Alias, Jordan David Fuqua, Paula Paraguassú Brandão, Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas

Abstract

The aim of this study was to verify the post-exercise hypotension phenomenon on two distinct somatotype. For this purpose, twenty-four normotensive trained men (23.2 ± 2.91 years; 73.78 ± 4.53 kg; 177.16 ± 5.73 cm; 23.58 ± 2.18 kg/m2) were divided into two groups (mesomorph and ectomorph). All subjects performed two 10-repetition maximum load test sessions (test and retest) for a whole-body workout routine of resistance exercises. After the load tests, subjects performed sessions structured for 3 sets of each exercise with loads of 85% of 10-repetition maximum loads with 2-min of rest between sets of exercises. The two-way ANOVA showed the same reduction pattern (p = 0.001) in post-exercise systolic blood pressure for both groups. Additionally, a prolonged reduction was observed only on the systolic blood pressure of the mesomorph group following the 10-min (Δ = 13.41%; ESs = 2.08) up to 60-min post-exercise (Δ = 5.64%; ESs = 0.89). However, the same kinetics were not observed in the ectomorph group, the reduction was found only at the 10-min post-exercise time point (Δ = 5.55%; ESs = 1.12).  On the other hand, no significant differences were found between groups for any diastolic blood pressure post-exercise time points. In conclusion, our data suggest that regardless the somatotype (mesomorph or ectomorph) a similar post-exercise hypotension phenomenon for systolic blood pressure was observed. However, it is important to highlight that those individuals classified as mesomorphs remained with a reduced systolic blood pressure about 60 minutes after performing exercise, which did not occurred in the ectomorph group. 


Keywords

Strength training; Blood pressure; Physical fitness; Body types

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.14198/jhse.2018.131.05





License URL: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/